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An experimental organization that
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impactful globalized collaborative
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How might we help ArmMe to implement a disruptive global supply chain designed for low carbon?
What if we would take advantage of all our pesonnal trips to transport our goods?
2020-05-23
Transport has become an essential component of almost all modern activity: in a century and a half, the exchange of goods has multiplied by 1000 on the surface of the globe. In Western societies, there is hardly an industrial or agricultural activity which is purely local, without the use of a means of transport between the place of production and the place of consumption. Since 1950, trade on international markets has increased by almost 30 times in volume according to the Center for Strategic Analysis. This development is not without consequences for energy needs and the environment. Road transport predominates all over the world and its energy consumption rose from 600 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe) in 1971 to 1,630 Mtoe in 2005 according to the report by Global Chance Towards the road. Air transport comes in second position with an energy consumption which went from 113 Mtoe in 1971 to 235 Mtoe and which is experiencing significant growth. All transport by boat, completely dependent on oil, reached in 2005 a final consumption of 206 Mtoe, just behind air transport. The target here is not to find alternative means but to avoid them or to disrupt the ways we use them.
ArmMe
Experimental Organization
Owner
How often are you buying products without knowing anything about what it took to produce and transport them?
We are what we buy, says sociologist. "I shop therefore I am," is now the basis of our civilisation, according to York sociologist Colin Campbell. What about how we buy? What about the impacts of our buyings on environmental and social issues? Do you consider them when you make the decision to buy product A against B? It is not an easy question because supply chains are global. Products can be assembled locally but composed by components coming from all other the world with huge environmental and social costs. This is the case for raw materials and finish goods. What if we try to measure them?
While self-expression may not matter if you’re buying light bulbs or other utilitarian products, experts have long known that people often buy things as a way to say something about themselves, whether that’s a Miley Cyrus T-shirt or a car... “In our quest to say who we are, it helps to simultaneously say who we are not.” Are We What We Buy? - Stanford GSB - As soon as you start looking at what you buy and what it tells about how you care about our common future, you maybe surprised of the decision you would make. Let's try to figure out?
ArmMe
Experimental Organization
Owner
Would you take part to the supply chain if it would reduce both prices and impacts?
As a general point of view we are very passive regarding what we buy even if there are exceptions. Imagine we were to design a global supply chain were people were self transporting not only the goods they buy but also some bought by their neighbors, friends, family or even some people they will never meet... Imagine that you are to buy something on the internet and that this specific thing will come to you like the garden gnome in the movie Amélie Poulain: step by step, transported by peers with only a marginal pollution cost because they will do it in the flow of their usual activities...
First, you have to consider that when you travel, main of the resources available are not used efficiently. Take space for instance, when you travel in a car, 60% of the time, only the driver is in the car and the car boot is empty. Planes can fly with only a few passengers like buses and trains during off-peak hours. The concept of marginal pollution is easy to understand. You won't double the consumption of oil if your car boot is full rather than empty as soon as the main energy is used to move the car. Then, you will save the energy that would have been necessary to move the goods.

 

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